Laois Aviation History


Laois has a long a proud tradition of achievements in aviation, the most well known of which is the achievement of Colonel James Fitzmaurice, a Portlaoise native who was co-pilot on the first plane to cross the Atlantic from East to West, in April 1928.

 

Laois Aviation History Events for Heritage Week 2021

These events are being organised by the Col Fitzmaurice Commemoration Committee for this year’s Heritage Week.

Tuesday 17th August at 7pm

“Fitz and the Famous Flight” A presentation by Teddy Fennelly, Chair of the Col Fitzmaurice Commemoration Committee at a conference entitled “Irish Aviation: Past, Present and Future. This is a recording of a presentation made in Clifden as part of the Alcock and Browne Centenary Celebrations in 2019. The presentation will stream live on the Laois Heritage Forum Facebook Page, no need to book, just tune in to Facebook at 7pm.

Wednesday 18th  August at 7pm

Tune in to “Nationwide” on RTÉ 1 Television to see a feature on the Col Fitzmaurice, the conservation of a newspaper archive relating to the first east west transatlantic flight and the Portlaoise Plane.

Wednesday 18th  August at 8pm

Talk by Liz D’Arcy paper conservator on the conservation of the Fitzmaurice Archive, and by Liam Byrne on his collection of Fitzmaurice and flight memorabilia. Register in advance for this webinar here.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. The Webinar will also Livestream on the Laois Heritage Forum Facebook page.

Saturday 21st August at 6pm

Public display of the Portlaoise Plane in Fitzmaurice Place Portlaoise. The newly restored Plane, built and flown in Portlaoise in 1912 by the Aldritt Family with the help of master carpenter John Conroy. Discovered in a private collection in the UK by Joe Rogers, the plane was brought back to Ireland by Teddy Fennelly and Alan Phelan and has now been fully restored and a replica of the original engine built. This event will allow the public to see the plane up close and hear about the conservation project to date. We will also have special guests from the Irish Air Corps and a piece of music by Martin Tourish and the young musicians of the Music Generation Laois Trad Orchestra.

To comply with public health guidelines, booking is required – booking link here.

Fitz and the Famous Flight

In April 1928, the Junkers aircraft the Bremen took off from Baldonnell Aerodrome in Dublin, and set out to cross the Atlantic from East to West – against prevailing winds – for the first time. On board was Portlaoise native Captain James Fitzmaurice, along with Germans Hermann Kohl and Ehrenfried Günther Freiherr von Hünefeld. When they touched down on Greenly Island, off the coast of Canada, more than 36 hours later, they made history.

The achievement has been celebrated in Laois over the years, and a series of commemorative events were held to mark the 90th anniversary of the flight, in 2018. This included an exhibition by artists Brendon Deacy, a documentary by Louis V Deacy and a joint Irish German commemorative flight and wreath-laying in October 2018.

Brochure from Fitzmaurice Exhibition

Ralph James, former GOC Irish Air Corps; Michael Parsons, chairman Laois Heritage; Donal Brennan, Director of Services LCC and Catherine Casey, Laois Heritage officer at The Dunamaise Arts Centre for the opening of the ‘Fitz & the 1st East-to-West Atlantic Flight’ exhibition.
Picture: Alf Harvey.

Donal Brennan, Director of Services LCC with Teddy Fennelly, chairman of the Fitzmaurice Commemoration committee at The Dunamaise Arts Centre for the opening of the ‘Fitz & the 1st East-to-West Atlantic Flight’ exhibition.
Picture: Alf Harvey.

Brendon Deacy, artist and exhibition curator with his daughters Ciana, Kitty and Maggie at The Dunamaise Arts Centre for the opening of the ‘Fitz & the 1st East-to-West Atlantic Flight’ exhibition.
Picture: Alf Harvey.

The wreath laying at the Fitzmaurice Bust at County Hall, Portlaoise.
Picture: Alf Harvey.

The fly over during the wreath laying at the Fitzmaurice Bust at County Hall, Portlaoise.
Picture: Alf Harvey.

The Portlaoise Plane

The first aeroplane built and flown in what is now the Republic of Ireland was constructed in Portlaoise (then Maryborough) by a family of renowned motor engineers, the Aldritts, Frank, the father and founder of the business, and his sons, Louis, Frank and Joseph. The Aldritts worked with master carpenter John Conroy and mechanic William Rogers to build their plane, and in 1912 it flew a short distance, witnessed by a number of people .

The Portlaoise Plane is a rare aviation artefact but, better still, it has a close connection with Ireland’s most famous aviation pioneer, Col. James Fitzmaurice, the co-pilot on the Bremen, the first aircraft to fly the Atlantic east to west in 1928. Fitzmaurice grew up in Portlaoise and received all his formal education in the local CBS, next door to Aldritts’ old garage. He later wrote that as a schoolboy he became involved in the plane’s construction, with particular mention of his mentor, Louis Aldritt, and it was from this early experience that he first acquired his interest in aeroplanes.

Following research by Joe Rogers, a descendant of William Rogers, and aviation enthusiasts Teddy Fennelly and Alan Phelan, the plane was discovered, after being housed in a private museum in the south of England and almost forgotten for 40 years. The plane was restored by aircraft engineers Brendan O’Donoghue and Johnny Molloy . The short clip below records the homecoming on the 14th July 2021.

 

 

Laois Represented at Major Conference on Irish Aviation History

Laois was represented at a major international conference held in Clifden in June 2019 to mark the centenary of the first non-stop transatlantic airplane flight by Alcock and Brown in June 1919.

Teddy Fennelly of Laois Heritage Society, Catherine Casey of Laois County Council and Michael McEvoy President of the Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland (also an active member of the Laois Model Aero Club) attended the conference organised by Galway County Council.

Teddy Fennelly (Laois Heritage Society), Catherine Casey (Laois County Council) and Michael McEvoy (Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland) at the recent conference on “Irish Aviation – Past, Present and Future”, held in Galway.

Teddy Fennelly (Laois Heritage Society), Catherine Casey (Laois County Council) and Michael McEvoy (Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland) at the recent conference on “Irish Aviation – Past, Present and Future”, held in Galway.

Teddy Fennelly, a lifelong aeronautics enthusiast, was introduced at the conference by Laois Heritage Officer Catherine Casey. Currently President of Laois Heritage Society and Chairman of the Laois Heritage Forum, Teddy has written numerous books, mainly historical and biographical, including the biography of Ireland’s most famous aviator, Col James Fitzmaurice, titled “Fitz and the Famous Flight”, published in 1998. He spoke about the life and achievements of Col Fitzmaurice, a Portlaoise native, as co-pilot of the first nonstop transatlantic plane flight from Europe to North America, in April 1928.

Those present were also fascinated to hear about the “Portlaoise Plane”, built by Louis & Frank Aldritt, Motor Engineers and Johnny Conroy Master Carpenter with the help of mechanic William Rogers – the first plane built and flown in what is now the Republic of Ireland. It is known that Aldritts had a patent to build an airplane as early as 1907. It is also on record that the Portlaoise Plane succeeded in covering a short distance in November, 1909.

Teddy Fennelly said “We know that Colonel James Fitzmaurice helped in its construction as a young boy, and it’s quite likely that this is where the seed was sown for his life-long passion for Aviation. The airplane remained in storage in the original Aldritt motor works at Bank Place, Portlaoise until the late 1970s. It was acquired by a private collector who transported the plane to his premises in the South of England, until we recently brought it home to Ireland. You can follow the story of the Portlaoise Plane at portlaoiseplane.com.

Teddy Fennelly with Chief Executive of Laois County Council, John Mulholland and Laois County Council staff Catherine Casey and Muireann Ní Chonaill, viewing the Portlaoise Plane before it went for extensive conservation

Teddy Fennelly with Chief Executive of Laois County Council, John Mulholland and Laois County Council staff Catherine Casey and Muireann Ní Chonaill, viewing the Portlaoise Plane before it went for extensive conservation

Another highlight of the conference was the display of model aircraft brought to Clifden by Laois and Midland Model Aero Clubs members Michael McEvoy, Mel Broad, Heather Broad and Martin Sweeney. The aircraft were on display in the Museum in Clifden for the duration of the commemoration events.

 

Michael McEvoy, Mel Broad, Heather Broad and Martin Sweeney of the Laois and Midlands Model Aero Clubs at the “Irish Aviation – Past, Present and Future” conference in Clifden.

Michael McEvoy, Mel Broad, Heather Broad and Martin Sweeney of the Laois and Midlands Model Aero Clubs at the “Irish Aviation – Past, Present and Future” conference in Clifden.

Michael McEvoy said “The Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland (MACI) was formed in 1939 by a group of model aircraft enthusiasts when model aircraft technology was in its infancy. Today, 80 years later, almost 6,000 enthusiasts have passed through MACI, many carrying their interests to a life in aeronautics, designing, maintaining and piloting a range of aircraft from a Cessna 150 to a 747 Jumbo Jet while others have taken the road to military aeronautics. The Laois Model Aero Club is one of 29 clubs nationwide with almost 500 members. The MACI website  covers all aspects relating to model aircraft and the many different types now available to the modelling enthusiast from a simple electric to a sophisticated turbine model”.

Catherine Casey, Heritage Officer with Laois County Council, said “with so many strands to the story, the history and the future of aviation in Ireland are firmly centred on County Laois. We look forward to working closely with MACI and Laois Heritage Society as we start to plan for the centenary of the first East West transatlantic flight, in 2028”.